Overview
  • Treefrog Treasure (ages 4+) is a platformer game that allows players to explore different worlds as a frog and learn fractions and numberline concepts. When certain obstacles are reached, a player must properly identify a target symbol, whole number, or fraction on a numberline to collect gems and complete the level. Hints are provided to help the player reach the correct answer when mistakes are made.

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  • Image of Word Document, Treefrog Treasure Lesson PlanTreefrog Treasure Sample Lesson Plan (PDF)

    Image of Word Document, Treefrog Treasure Sample Lesson PlanTreefrog Treasure Sample Lesson Plan (DOCX)

  • Number Explanation
    3.NF.1 Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
    3.NF.2a Represent a fraction 1/b on a number line diagram by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line.
    3.NF.2b Represent a fraction a/b on a number line diagram by marking off a lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.
    3.NF.3a Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
    3.NF.3b Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3. Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
    4.NF.1 Explain why a fraction a/b is equivalent to a fraction (n × a)/(n × b) by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use this principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.
    4.NF.2 Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators, e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark fraction such as 1/2. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols , =, or
    4.NF.3c Add and subtract mixed numbers with like denominators, e.g., by replacing each mixed number with an equivalent fraction, and/or by using properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
    4.NF.5 Express a fraction with denominator 10 as an equivalent fraction with denominator 100, and use this technique to add two fractions with respective denominators 10 and 100.
    4.NF.6 Use decimal notation for fractions with denominators 10 or 100.
    4.NF.7 Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two decimals refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols , =, or
    5.NF.1 Add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators (including mixed numbers) by replacing given fractions with equivalent fractions in such a way as to produce an equivalent sum or difference of fractions with like denominators.